10+ A Day is The New 5+ A Day

Getting your 5+ a day

Oh no, if you’re struggling with the old 5+ A Day, then 10 + a Day is nigh on impossible. But read on, there is help at hand. But first, let’s see why we need those extra helpings of greens.

Why 10+ a Day Scores So Well

New worldwide research by the famous Imperial College of London found eye-opening health benefits when people increased their consumption of fruit and vegetables to 10 or more servings a day. This study wasn’t small by any means. It involved over 2 million people worldwide.  The results revealed that eating up to 800g fruit and vegetables a day (which is a lot by anyone’s standards) is associated with some pretty impressive health gains.

The most impressive? A 31% reduction in premature death which equates out to something like 7.8 million premature deaths worldwide, that could be avoided if ate more fruit and greens.

How Well Do Kiwis Score?

Currently, many kiwis fall well short of even the current 5 + a day recommendation. In the 2015/2016 health survey, it showed only 40% of adults eat the recommended 5 + a day.

What’s a Serving?

Vegetables

  • ½ a cup of cooked vegetables (e.g. broccoli, cauliflower, pumpkin)
  • Or ½ a cup of salad

Fruit

  • One medium sized apple, pear, banana or orange
  • Or ½ a cup of fruit salad

An easy guide –  one portion of fruit and veg fits into the palm of your hand.

tips to get your 5+ a day

5 Ways to get More Fruit and Vegetables in Your Day

  1. Make a plan. It’s a lot easier to hit your target when you have worked it out in advance. Boost your with evening meals with extra vegetables and if there are leftovers, you can use them for lunches, meals and snacks.
  2. Colours count! Each food colour gives a different range of nutrients. So mix it up – and try to use fewer of the more starchy kind. Yes, we know chips are vegetables.
  3. Buy vegetables and fruit that are in season. Not only are they fresher, they are cheaper too. Canned and frozen are still good for you.
  4. Dressings make vegetables more exciting! So splash it on – no one want to eat dry salads with no zest or fun. Just watch the sugar content in some of those dressing – best of all, make your own with simple olive oil, and balsamic vinegar.
  5. Sneak them in! Your main dish is a great place to load up on veggies…aka hide them. So bulk up your curries, stir-fries, mince, etc with some extra healthy ingredients.
TAPS No: MR5732

Added Mojo is an easy to swallow 1-A Day wholefood multivitamin that provides 100% of your 12 recommended daily vitamins and 6 minerals from 10+ servings of fruit and vegetables. It contains no synthetic ingredients, flavourings or fillers.

Added Mojo vitamins and minerals are extracted from 7 fruit, 12 vegetables and Chlorella. The fruit and vegetables are selected from organic growers and tested for their nutritional content. Only the most nutritious produce is used. The vitamins and minerals are cold extracted and dried at low temperatures to maintain the integrity of their nutrients and health giving phytonutrients.

Shop Added Mojo on our secure online store.

Print Friendly

Source

Are Fruit and Veges Best “Ugly”?

ugly fruits added mojo

Every year million upon millions of tons of perfectly healthy fruit and vegetables are sent to rubbish dumps worldwide, simply because they are “ugly”. Scarred, blemished, misshapen fruit are tossed out because retailers want to present the perfect samples to their customers.

There’s nothing wrong with them, no danger to health – in fact there’s growing evidence that ugly fruit may even be healthier.

There’s lots of research to do, but in an unofficial experiment in Virginia USA, orchardist Eliza Greenman, tested scabbed and unscabbed apples and found the less perfect, scarred apples had a 2 to 5 percent higher sugar content than her unblemished crop. They may also be more nutritious with higher levels of antioxidants.  When interviewed Greenman said, “I believe stress can help create a super fruit.”

She may have a point. There are on-going studies around the world that are showing indications that stressed fruit and vegetables can contain healthier, antioxidant phenolic compounds called phenylpropanoids. For example, in Japan a study of Japanese knotweed, a plant treasured by the Chinese and Japanese for its medicinal qualities, found that when infected with common fungi, its resveratrol content increased. Resveratrol as we all know, is well-known for its antioxidant properties. So the point is: These antioxidants protect both plants, and could also benefit us – so should we choose to eat the ugly fruit?

Should we stop buying “perfect” fruit and veg?

All fruit and veg is, of course, good for you. The question is, are you discarding blemished fruit and potentially something that’s even better for you?

Anyone who has been a backyard gardener certainly knows just how good it is to enjoy home grown fruit and vegetable – no matter how misshapen they are. In fact, there’s a lot of fun in discovery some weird looking veggies in your patch.

Can’t face that ugly fruit?

Some people, kids in particular, may take exception to finding an ugly apple in their lunchbox. After all, getting them to eat good looking greens can be hard enough, right?  If this is the case there is a way to top up the magic they may be missing with a whole food, natural vitamin, like Added Mojo.

Added Mojo is an easy to swallow 1-A Day wholefood multivitamin that provides 100% of your 12 recommended daily vitamins and 6 minerals from 10+ servings of fruit and vegetables. It contains no synthetic ingredients, flavourings or fillers.

Added Mojo vitamins and minerals are extracted from 7 fruit, 12 vegetables and Chlorella. The fruit and vegetables are selected from organic growers and tested for their nutritional content. Only the most nutritious produce is used. The vitamins and minerals are cold extracted and dried at low temperatures to maintain the integrity of their nutrients and health giving phytonutrients.

Shop Added Mojo on our secure online store.

TAPS No: MR5744
Always read the label and use as directed. Vitamins and minerals are supplementary to and not a replacement for a balanced diet. Good3 Ltd, Auckland, NZ.

Print Friendly

Source

How Do You Keep a Picky Eater Healthy?

how to help picky eaters

Do you have concerns about your child’s eating habits and not getting the best nutrition for growth and development? Perhaps your child won’t eat meals, avoids a certain food group such as vegetables, has a limited food repertoire or has difficulty eating certain foods?
What our wee ones will or won’t eat is a common cause of worry for many Kiwi parents. Not only is there considerable confusion about what to feed our children, and concerns about the lack of nutrients in our food we are providing, but there is also a growing number of children who are deemed picky. In fact, research indicates a massive 30% of New Zealand toddlers may be classified as fussy and missing out on important proteins, fruits and vegetables. These statistics are important, because establishing great food habits early on may help to avoid health problems as a teenager or adult.

So, how do you know if your child is fussy? What might be the consequences and what you can do?


Is your child a picky eater?

Picky eating is a common problem during childhood, with worldwide statistics indicating that between 8-50% of children may be affected and newly emerging research detailing possible long-term effects on our children’s growth, development and health.
Picky eating is broadly characterised by the toddler or child eating a limited amount of food, restricting intake of some food groups, particularly vegetables, being unwilling to try new foods, and having strong food preferences often leading parents to provide their child with a meal different from the rest of the family. The impact on the family and child can be massive.
In 2017, research aimed to assess the health and nutrition and development of preschool picky vs none-picky eaters was carried out in Taiwan, where a whopping 54% of children are thought to be picky. The study results suggested the most common typical behaviours of a picky eater include: being unwilling to eat regular meals (18.5%); refusing food, particularly fruit and vegetables (16.7%); eating sweets or snacks instead of meals (14.8%); being unwilling to try new foods (14.2%); excessive drinking of milk (14.2%) and accepting only a few types of food (13.6%). The common dislike foods among these young kids were vegetables (38.9%), fruit (22.2%) and meat (37.1%).


Eat your greens, they’re good for you!

Although this is only one study, reduced intakes of fruits and vegetables is a common finding in many research studies on picky eaters. Closer to home, New Zealand research found that fussy eaters ate fewer fruits and vegetables than non-picky eaters in a group of 4–8-year-old Kiwi kids.
Additionally, research published in 2016, implied that the intake of nutrients such as carotene, iron, and zinc intakes was lower in our picky eaters than in the non-picky eaters, with free sugar intake much higher than recommended. These nutrient differences were put down to lower intakes of meat, fish, vegetables, and fruits in the picky eaters.


How may this affect my baby or child’s health?

The Taiwanese study outlined earlier explored the development of these fussy eaters, based on answering a questionnaire about learning ability (attention and learning); verbal development (verbal development, language learning, confluence in speech); and interpersonal relationships (adaptation to new environments, cooperation, adaptation of being separated from relatives). Compared to the non-picky group, a significantly lower score of all measures was found in the picky group. Additionally, poor levels of physical activities were also significantly more common in picky eaters, as were constipation, and recent and/or more frequent acute infectious illnesses.
Whether picky eating behaviours are at all predictive of later eating problems may depend on how parents and caregivers respond to the behaviours.


What can you do?
Home hints. There are many things you can try at home. For example:

  • My mantra is “my role as a caregiver is to offer healthy foods – their role is to eat it.” Always ensure you provide the most nutritious foods possible
  • Involve children in shopping and food preparation as this may increase their interest in eating
  • Ensure meals are taken in a relaxed setting and without distractions such as noise, stress or the TV blaring
  • Recognise that kids only need small portions. Piling up their plate is a sure way to put a fussy eat off their food
  • Introduce new foods slowly. A great tip is to put something familiar and something not so familiar on the plate to reduce anxiety levels
  • Seek help with both diet and behaviour. It would be worth checking out the advice given by the Ministry of Health, The New Zealand Nutrition Foundation or your registered Nutritionist, Dietitian or health care provider that specialises in childrens’ health.


How do I boost my child’s vegetables and fruit intake?

Including a supplement in your child’s diet may support normal growth and development. The great news is that Added Mojo is a natural health supplement containing only organic fruit and vegetables, gently dried and powdered to retain their natural goodness. It provides 100% of your 12 recommended daily vitamins and six minerals from 10+ servings of fruit and vegetables, with no added synthetic ingredients, flavourings or fillers. Just perfect for kids (and adults too!) for supporting their health and wellbeing.

Shop Added Mojo on our secure online store.

Always read the label and use as directed. Vitamins and minerals are supplementary to and not a replacement for a balanced diet.
Good3 Ltd, Auckland, NZ. TAPS MR5831
Author: Sheena Hendon, registered nutritionist and naturopath.
Print Friendly

Source

How Much Goodness are you Really Getting from your Fruit and Veg?

how much goodness is in your fruit and veg?

When it comes to fruits and vegetables, we all know the more the better for optimal health and wellness for all the family – from digestive, heart and skin health, to hormone and brain function. But how much goodness are we really getting from our fresh produce?

Naturopath and Nutritionist, Sheena Hendon, gives us the juice on some of the top nutrients we find in our edible plants, and the evidence-based research on the impact soil, processing, storage and cooking may have on the quality of our local fruits and vegetable.

What are some of the top nutrients powering up our fresh produce?

Veggies and fruits are packed with vitamins, minerals, fibre, and antioxidants, and contain bioactive phytochemicals which may provide desirable health benefits. While they contain many nutrients in differing amounts here are several of their key nutritional powerhouses.

  • Calcium. Essential support for healthy bones and teeth and needed for normal function of muscle, nerves and some glands.
  • Fibre. A high-fibre diet has always been synonymous with ‘being regular’, but also supports healthy bowel function, cholesterol levels, blood sugar levels and weight management.
  • Folate. Our bodies need this B-vitamin to make DNA and other genetic material and for the body’s cells to divide.
  • Iron. Vital support for healthy blood and normal function of all our cells.
  • Magnesium. Necessary support for bone health and involved in hundreds of body reactions supporting energy production, muscle and nerve function.
  • Potassium. May support the maintenance of healthy blood pressure.
  • Vitamin A. Important for normal vision, reproduction and the immune system and helps support the heart, lungs, kidneys, and other organs to work properly.
  • Vitamin C. This power packed nutrient provides support during times of tiredness and fatigue, supports normal immune, psychological and neurological function, and acts as a powerful antioxidant which supports the protection of our cells against damage.

What about the benefits of plant phytonutrients and antioxidants?

Phytonutrients or phytochemicals (those you may know about include Beta-carotene, Lycopene, Lutein, Resveratrol, Anthocyanins and Zeaxanthin) are beneficial chemicals only found in fruit, vegetables, grains, and other plant foods. Some phytonutrients help our cells communicate better with each other; others help prevent cell mutations, others are potent antioxidants, and many have functions we are only beginning to understand. In general, they are anti-ageing, and support normal immunity and health.

Antioxidants are phytochemicals, but what do they do specifically? Our cells are exposed to a variety of oxidising agents present in air, food, and water. Overproduction of oxidants can lead to oxidative stress and damage. Antioxidants may slow down this oxidative stress. Fruit and vegetables contain a wide variety of antioxidant compounds including ascorbic acid, carotenoids, vitamin E and phenolics, such as flavonoids and coumarin.

What are the health benefits of getting your nutrients from whole fruit and vegetables?

Research indicates that the nutrients in our fruits and veggies work together to provide maximum health benefits. For example, one published paper suggests that vitamin C in apples accounted for only 0.4 % of a total activity suggesting that most of the antioxidant activity (99.6%) may come from a natural combination of phytochemicals such as phenolics and flavonoids.

Additionally, although supplementation has its place it seems all may not be equal. Synthetic and food-derived vitamin C is chemically identical, but the numerous nutrients and phytochemicals in our whole fruits and vegetables may positively influence its bioavailability. Research indicates that various plant flavonoids such as hesperidin and rutin may enhance vitamin C uptake. Another piece of research demonstrates that the polyphenols in blackcurrants work with other blackcurrant compounds to support healthy immunity. That is why eating a nutritious, and varied diet including a wide variety of whole fruits and vegetables is vital as a starting point for optimum wellness.

What about losses from our soil, processing, storage or cooking?

Our NZ volcanic soils may lack essential minerals. As a result, the produce that grows in these soils can be nutrient deficient, particularly selenium, iodine, zinc, chromium and boron – all minerals essential for the functioning of the human body.

Nutrient levels in our fresh produce can be affected by ripeness, plant variety, distance to market, storage, exposure to light, and processing. Some organic fruits and vegetables may contain different levels of nutrients than conventional foods at harvest or collection. And studies show that the natural antioxidant, Lycopene, responsible for the characteristic red colour of tomatoes is degraded during some processing procedures and may lose some health benefits.

Cooking can also cause losses. Starchy veggies may lose between 40-80 of their vitamin C during cooking, because of leaching and oxidation. Freezing reduces vitamin C slightly, but at the end of long-term frozen storage (12 months), a significant decrease (33% to 55%) in vitamin C can occur.

The verdict

Getting our nutrients from whole fruits and veggies is best, but we need to be aware that they may not be as nutrient dense as we think. To get the best from your plant-based foods remember to;

  • Shop for the freshest
  • Choose those in season
  • Grow your own in nutrient-rich soils
  • Eat raw or lightly cooked to retain nutrients

 

Getting your daily dose of goodness

Prevention is better than cure and ensuring you and your family are as healthy and well as possible is vital. That’s where a daily multivitamin made only from fruits and vegetable and containing a balanced combination of phytochemicals vitamins and minerals found in our whole fruit and vegetables comes in.

Added Mojo is a natural health supplement containing only organic fruit and vegetables, gently dried and powdered to retain their natural goodness. It provides 100% of your 12 recommended daily vitamins and six minerals from 10+ servings of fruit and vegetables and is a source of many phytochemicals including lutein, lycopene and zeaxanthin, with no added synthetic ingredients, flavourings or fillers. Shop Added Mojo on our secure online store.

Always read the label and use as directed. Vitamins and minerals are supplementary to and not a replacement for a balanced diet.
Good3 Ltd, Auckland, NZ. TAPS MR5900
Author: Sheena Hendon, registered nutritionist and naturopath.
Print Friendly

Source