Can You Fail a Drug Test After Taking CBD?

Cannabidiol, or CBD, is a non-psychoactive compound produced by the marijuana plant that seems to be everywhere these days. Maybe you’ve even been asked if you’d like it added to your morning cup of joe!

Interestingly, the chemical structure of CBD is very similar to THC, which is the marijuana-derived compound responsible for getting people high and the one screened for by drug tests.

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This structural similarity begs the question: Could using CBD make you fail a drug test? In this episode of Reactions, we break down the chemistry behind the possibilities:

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Reactions is a video series produced by the American Chemical Society and PBS Digital Studios. Subscribe to Reactions at http://bit.ly/ACSReactions, and follow us on Twitter @ACSreactions.

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Cannabis Use Among Older Adults Rising Rapidly

Study is first state-wide investigation of cannabis use among older Americans and the outcomes they experience

Cannabis use among older adults is growing faster than any other age group but many report barriers to getting medical marijuana, a lack of communication with their doctors and a lingering stigma attached to the drug, according to researchers.

The study, the first to look at how older Americans use cannabis and the outcomes they experience, was published this month in the journal Drugs & Aging.

“Older Americans are using cannabis for a lot of different reasons,” said study co-author Hillary Lum, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. “Some use it to manage pain while others use it for depression or anxiety.”

The 2016 National Survey of Drug Use and Health showed a ten-fold increase in cannabis use among adults over age 65.

The researchers set out to understand how older people perceived cannabis, how they used it and the positive and negative outcomes associated with it.

They conducted 17 focus groups in in senior centers, health clinics and cannabis dispensaries in 13 Colorado counties that included more than 136 people over the age of 60. Some were cannabis users, others were not.

“We identified five major themes,” Lum said.

These included: A lack of research and education about cannabis; A lack of provider communication about cannabis; A lack of access to medical cannabis; A lack of outcome information about cannabis use; A reluctance to discuss cannabis use.

Researchers found a general reluctance among some to ask their doctors for a red card to obtain medical marijuana. Instead, they chose to pay more for recreational cannabis.

Lum said this could be driven by feeling self-conscious about asking a doctor for cannabis. That, she said, points to a failure of communication between health care providers and their patients.

“I think [doctors can] be a lot more open to learning about it and discussing it with their patients,” said one focus group respondent. “Because at this point I have told my primary care I was using it on my shoulder. And that was the end of the conversation. He didn’t want to know why, he didn’t want to know about effects, didn’t want to know about side effects, didn’t want to know anything.”

Some said their doctors were unable or unwilling to provide a certificate, the document needed to obtain medical marijuana. They also said physicians need to educate themselves on the latest cannabis research.

Some older users reported positive outcomes when using cannabis for pain as opposed to taking highly addictive prescription opioids. They often differentiated between using cannabis for medical reasons and using it recreationally.

“Although study participants discussed recreational cannabis more negatively than medical cannabis, they felt it was more comparable to drinking alcohol, often asserting a preference for recreational cannabis over the negative effects of alcohol,” the study said.

The researchers also found that despite the legalization of cannabis in Colorado and other states, some older people still felt a stigma attached to it.

“Some participants, for example, referred to the movie `Reefer Madness’ (1936) and other anti-marijuana propaganda adverts that negatively framed cannabis as immoral and illegal,” the researchers said.

The study adds to the growing literature on the diversity of marijuana use patterns in older adults, said co-author Sara Honn Qualls, PhD, ABPP, professor of psychology and director of the Gerontology Center at the University of Colorado Colorado Springs.

“Older adults who use marijuana are ingesting it in a variety of ways for multiple purposes,” she said. “This and other papers from the same project show growing acceptance of marijuana use for medical purposes by older adults, and a clear desire to have their primary health providers involved in educating them about options and risks.

Lum agreed.

She said Colorado, the first state to legalize recreational marijuana, provides a unique laboratory to gauge public attitudes toward cannabis.

“From a physician’s standpoint this study shows the need to talk to patients in a non-judgmental way about cannabis,” she said. “Doctors should also educate themselves about the risks and benefits of cannabis and be able to communicate that effectively to patients.”

Article by University of Colorado. The study co-authors include: Julie Bobitt; Melissa Schuchman; Robert Wickersham; Kanika Arora; Gary Milavetz and Brian Kaskie.

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73% of Oncology Providers See Benefit of Medical Marijuana

A University of Colorado Cancer Center study presented at the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting 2019 shows that while 73 percent of surveyed oncology providers believe that medical marijuana provides benefits for cancer patients, only 46 percent are comfortable recommending it. Major concerns included uncertain dosing, limited knowledge of available products and where to get them, and possible interactions with other medications.

“I think in some cases we’re missing out on providing a useful tool. Providers think it has benefit, but aren’t comfortable recommending it,” says Ashley E. Glode, PharmD, assistant professor at the Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, and the study’s first author.

Survey respondents included 48 specialized oncologists, 47 physicians, 53 registered nurses, 17 pharmacists, and 7 “other” oncology providers. Seventy-nine percent reported that educational programs both during training and as continuing medical education courses could increase their comfort level with medical marijuana prescribing. Interestingly, 68 percent of providers reported receiving information about medical marijuana from their patients – the next most common sources of information were news media (accessed by 55 percent of providers), and other providers (53 percent).

“We asked and most providers didn’t train in a state where medical marijuana was legal. We need to adapt our healthcare education to include this, and also offer trainings on medical marijuana to current providers,” Glode says.

Providers also reported legal and regulatory concerns, especially providers working in academic medical centers who expressed uncertainty whether recommending medical marijuana could jeopardize federal funding (marijuana remains a U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency Schedule 1 drug). Providers felt as if additional clinical data describing the effectiveness of medical marijuana and endorsed guidelines describing the conditions and situations in which it should be used would increase their comfort in prescribing.

“Still, the biggest issue that providers saw is the lack of certainty in dosing,” Glode says. “The issue is it’s not regulated – a dispensary might say a product has this much THC and this much CBD, but no one is testing that for sure. Limited data suggest that patients should start low and slow, no more than 10mg of THC in a dose, but we don’t know that’s what patients are really getting. Then from a consumption perspective, inhalation and smoking is the least preferred due to possible damage to the lung. So many doctors recommend edibles, oils, and tinctures, but we still don’t have good data comparing dosage across these forms.”

Glode and study colleagues including Stephen Leong, MD, hope to expand the survey to gather a more nationally representative sample.

“Knowledge is an issue,” Glode says. “If we could do a better job educating our healthcare providers, it might be used more often and potentially more safely.”

Article by University of Colorado.

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Is All Cannabis Use Self-Medication?

By Susan Boskey

Recently I was invited to be on a panel about cannabis use for seniors. In an email exchange with one of the organizers I asked, “Are you referring to recreational or medicinal use?” The response I received back was unexpected. She said, “I see no reason to treat medical and recreational differently. Everyone is using cannabis for medicine whether they realize it or not.”

Really? I have been pondering her response ever since. Seems like this concept has gained traction as a cannabis-culture meme.

First of all, I think her response has something to do with the fact of living in Washington State where both adult-use and medical are legal. What I mean is . . . probably in the 10 states and DC that have legality for both, more people use cannabis than in medical-only states. That’s pretty obvious.

But what’s not so obvious, to me, anyway, is the thought that ALL of these users are using cannabis in an attempt to get better in their own way. That would include those using cannabis products containing an extremely high percentage of THC, say 15+ percent and smoking/using it several times a day and others who go ‘blotto’ to the extent of becoming non-functional on a regular basis.

Self-medicating? Interesting but I’m not so sure it’s true.

I guess it depends on how you define self-medicating. The online Cambridge Dictionary defines it as: “to take medicine or drugs to help you with a condition without asking a doctor”

If someone determines to help a condition they experience by using cannabis, wouldn’t they also want to learn the best ways to use it to accomplish that?

If they don’t have a conscious intent to use cannabis to help their health and wellbeing and consistently use more than necessary to do so, is that an act of medication or potential self-destruction?

Do we give unconscious use of cannabis a high-five pass because it’s cannabis whereas we might not if it were alcohol?

Where do addictive personality traits enter the conversation?

Is the blank-check assertion of self-medication instead cover for denial? Here are some indicators of possible cannabis addiction:

  1. Tolerance and withdrawal
  2. Using more than intended
  3. Unable to cut down or stop use
  4. Lots of time spent getting high
  5. Reduced activities
  6. Continuing to get high despite the problems it causes
  7. Using it to escape from problems
  8. Depending on it to be creative or to relax or enjoy yourself
  9. Choosing relationships and activities based on whether or not you will be able to get high
  10. An inability to attend to daily responsibilities [1]

I have more questions than answers at this point. But what I know for certain is that cannabis is an amazing and beneficial plant and that I am committed to learning and sharing its whole story. In my world every story has at least two sides. Methinks those who paint something as being all one way, may possibly have something to gain by doing so.


Susan is a Certified Cannabis Practitioner and graduate of the Holistic Cannabis Academy with over 45 years of personal involvement in the spectrum of wellness modalities. Her mission today is to intervene in the noise of modern life and help her clients identify and remove stressors that trigger their dis-ease. She personalizes care plans regarding the best cannabis strain, dose and delivery system to address her client’s issue. As a non-physician coach Susan enjoys the added flexibility of also providing protocols for simple lifestyle changes to accelerate the healing process. Visit her website: LifestyleWellnessRx.com 

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Image credit: Pixabay

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Mount Sinai Study Finds CBD Treats Opioid Addiction By Reducing Cravings and Anxiety

Mount Sinai study finds CBD is effective at treating opioid addiction by reducing cravings and anxiety without harmful side effects

Cannabidiol (CBD) reduced cue-induced craving and anxiety in individuals with a history of heroin abuse, suggesting a potential role for it in helping to break the cycle of addiction, according to research conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published May 21 in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

The study also revealed that CBD tended to reduce physiological measures of stress reactivity, such as increased heart rate and cortisol levels, that are induced by drug cues.

The wide availability and use of heroin and prescription opioid medications in the United States during the past decade has resulted in an unprecedented epidemic involving more than 300,000 deaths. Despite this staggering toll, limited non-opioid medication options have been developed. Two of the current options, methadone and buprenorphine, are opioid substitution therapies which work on the same opioid receptors (mu receptors) as heroin and other potent opioid agonists.

These medications, however, carry a stigma as well as their own addiction risk, are mired in tight governmental regulation, and therefore are underutilized by the millions of people diagnosed with opioid use disorder. Such a treatment gap highlights the urgent need to develop novel therapeutic strategies that do not target the mu opioid receptor.

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“To address the critical need for new treatment options for the millions of people and families who are being devastated by this epidemic, we initiated a study to assess the potential of a non-intoxicating cannabinoid on craving and anxiety in heroin-addicted individuals,” says Yasmin Hurd, PhD, the Ward-Coleman Chair of Translational Neuroscience at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Director of the Addiction Institute at Mount Sinai and first author of the study. “The specific effects of CBD on cue-induced drug craving and anxiety are particularly important in the development of addiction therapeutics because environmental cues are one of the strongest triggers for relapse and continued drug use.”

Previous preclinical work conducted by Dr. Hurd and her lab team at Mount Sinai, in animals with a history of heroin self-administration, demonstrated that CBD reduced the animals’ tendency to use heroin in response to a drug-associated cue. To determine whether the preclinical work could be translated to humans, her lab then conducted a series of clinical studies that demonstrated CBD was safe and tolerable in humans.

The current study used a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled design to explore the acute (one hour, two hours, and 24 hours), short-term (three consecutive days), and protracted (seven days after the last of three consecutive daily administrations) effects of CBD administration on drug cue-induced craving and anxiety in drug-abstinent individuals with heroin use disorder. Secondary measures assessed participants’ positive and negative affect, cognition, and physiological status.

Through the study, 42 drug-abstinent men and women were randomly assigned to receive either 400 mg or 800 mg of an oral CBD solution or a matching placebo. Participants were then exposed to neutral and drug-related cues during the course of three sessions: immediately following administration, 24 hours after CBD or placebo administration, and seven days after the third and final daily CBD or placebo administration. Neutral cues consisted of a three-minute video showing relaxing scenarios, such as scenes of nature, while drug-related cues included a three-minute video showing intravenous or intranasal drug use and exposure to heroin-related paraphernalia like syringes, rubber ties, and packets of powder resembling heroin. Measures of opioid craving, anxiety, positive and negative affect, and vital signs (skin temperature, blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, and oxygen saturation) were obtained at different times during the sessions.

The study team found that CBD, in contrast to placebo, significantly reduced both the craving and anxiety induced by drug cues compared with neutral cues in the acute term. CBD also showed significant protracted effects on these measures seven days after the final short-term exposure. In addition, CBD reduced the drug cue-induced physiological measures of heart rate and salivary cortisol levels. There were no significant effects on cognition, and there were no serious adverse events. The capacity of CBD to reduce craving and anxiety one week after the final administration mirrors the results of the original preclinical animal study, suggesting that the effects of CBD are long-lasting, even when the cannabinoid would not be expected to be present in the body.

Our findings indicate that CBD holds significant promise for treating individuals with heroin use disorder,” says Dr. Hurd. “A successful non-opioid medication would add significantly to the existing addiction medication toolbox to help reduce the growing death toll, enormous health care costs, and treatment limitations imposed by stringent government regulations amid this persistent opioid epidemic.”

Dr. Hurd’s research team is working on two follow-up studies: one delves into understanding the mechanisms of CBD’s effects on the brain; the second paves the way for the development of unique CBD medicinal formulations that are likely to become a significant part of the medical arsenal available to address the opioid epidemic.

Article published by Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

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UK’s First Vegan And Vegetarian CBD-Infused Restaurant Opens In Brighton

By Amanda Froelich

Cannabidiol, or CBD, is taking the world by storm. This is because the component of the marijuana plant has been proven to produce strong medicinal and therapeutic effects for a wide range of conditions, including cancer, Alzheimer’s, pain, and nausea. Because of the efficacy and safety of the plant, the UK legalized medical marijuana treatments and hemp CBD products in November of 2018. One month later, The Canna Kitchen opened its doors to the public. The vegan and vegetarian restaurant is the first in the UK to infuse cuisine with CBD.

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According to High Times, the restaurant is located several blocks away from the ocean in Brighton. Sam Evolution, the founder and manager of The Canna Kitchen, chose the location, the interior’s smooth, pastel tones and the ornately designed wood detail to create a pleasant experience for customers. He and his team want to improve the way people perceive the plant, which is why they create high-quality, healthy, and creative dishes that can all be infused with cannabis, based on the patron’s desires.

“I want to create something special,” said Head Chef Charlotte Kjaer.“I like to combine natural flavors and aromas of the plant with different types of food. I want to transmit the passion I have for this wonderful plant through my creations.”

The chef is familiar with the plant’s many components, and their benefits. “Everybody is talking about CBD now but we also cook with other cannabinoids as CBG (cannabigerol) and CBN (cannabinol),” she continued.

Dining options at The Canna Kitchen range from a Buddha Bowl (tofu, seasonal roast roots, quinoa salad, homemade slaw, hummus, salad, housemate sauerkraut, and CBD-infused tahini) to the local soup of the day, served with local sourdough bread and CBD-infused olive oil. For a sweet treat, you can choose from a chocolate hemp brownie, poached pair with hemp vanilla ice cream, or a “canna Snickers” bar. And to wash it all down, there is hemp tea.

“Our mission is to change the way people think about the cannabis plant by creating beautiful vegetarian dishes which are tastefully complemented with its infusion. Cannabis is a highly nutritious, versatile, and powerful herb; it is packed full of flavor, fragrance, and natural therapeutic benefit.” Kjaer said.

The experience doesn’t end with the meal. Afterward, you can move upstairs to the dispensary and lounge section. Maybe you’ll choose to enjoy a CBD joint while sipping infused Moroccan coffee on the terrace with friends. If you came empty-handed, you can purchase everything from vaporizers to skin-care products to pet food (all with THC levels below 0.2%) from the dispensary.

The stigma associated with cannabis is lessening, which is why the public’s response to The Canna Kitchen has been “very good,” according to Evolution. “People are curious towards the plant and we want to spark a larger conversation around it, inform the public.” 

“I feel that eventual decriminalization is inevitable, it’s just a matter of time. I would like to see a great deal of education brought forward in relation to the responsible use of, not only cannabis, but all plant medicines, which are here to help us. I think The Canna Kitchen will most certainly lead the way for many more concepts like it in the UK. I have learned about Jeremy Corbyn’s son opening a hemp cafe in north London, we are extremely excited about this, and needless to say he has our full support on this project. It’s an exciting time for hemp/cannabis, which is being bought back into mainstream recognition, where it belongs,” he concluded.

What are your thoughts? Please comment below and share this news!

IMAGE CREDIT: TheCannaKitchen


Amanda Froelich — I’m an RHN, plant-based chef, freelance writer with 6+ years of experience, Reiki master therapist, world traveler and enthusiast of everything to do with animal rights, sustainability, cannabis and conscious living. I share healthy recipes at Bloom for Life and cannabis-infused treats at My Stoned Kitchen. Read More stories by Amanda Froelich

This article was sourced from Truth Theory

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Carl’s Jr To Debut CBD-Infused Burger On 4/20 That Costs $4.20

By Amanda Froelich

Each day, more people choose to supplement with CBD. This is likely because the component of the cannabis plant (which is non-psychoactive, unlike THC) has been proven to benefit a variety of ailments — from cancer to Alzheimer’s. The problem is, CBD remains illegal in many states and countries. As a result, the use of it still holds a stigma.

The public’s perception of cannabis is rapidly changing, however. This was made evident when last week, the burger chain Carl’s Jr announced that it will be celebrating 4/20 (or the “stoner’s holiday”) by debuting a CBD-infused burger.

According to The Independent, the Rocky Mountain High: CheeseBurger Delight (CBD) features two 100 percent charbroiled beef patties, pickled jalapeños, pepper jack cheese and Crisscut fries. Reportedly, it will be topped with a special hemp-based CBD oil-infused version of Carl’s Jr signature Santa Fe Sauce.

The special will only be available at one location in Denver, Colorado. Furthermore, it will only last the day of 4/20. However, cannabis enthusiasts can visit the Carl’s Jr restaurant located at 4050 Colorado Blvd in Denver, Colorado and purchase the special for just $4.20. If it turns out to be a hit, Carl’s Jr might make it a permanent menu item.

To create the CBD sauce, the chain partnered with the local Colorado company Bluebird Botanicals for its hemp-derived oil. Consuming CBD does not result in a change to mood or perception. Its most notable benefits are relaxation and pain-relief.

“From our early introduction into plant-based options to bringing the rare indulgence of truffles to our menu with the new Bacon Truffle Angus Burger, our customers have come to expect innovative and unique menu offerings, and we’re thrilled to be the first quick service restaurant to be testing CBD infused options,” said Patty Trevino, senior vice president of brand marketing at Carl’s Jr.

What are your thoughts? Please comment below and share this news!


Amanda Froelich — I’m an RHN, plant-based chef, freelance writer with 6+ years of experience, Reiki master therapist, world traveler and enthusiast of everything to do with animal rights, sustainability, cannabis and conscious living. I share healthy recipes at Bloom for Life and cannabis-infused treats at My Stoned Kitchen. Read More stories by Amanda Froelich

IMAGE CREDIT: Carl’s Jr.

This article was sourced from Truth Theory.

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NJ to Vote on Marijuana Legalization Next Week, as PA Proposes Recreational Bill

By Aaron Kesel

According to Reddit /r/cannabis, two neighboring states this week in the U.S — New Jersey and PA — have had cannabis legislation action in favor of legalizing marijuana.

“Colorado has been a success. The tax revenue it putting money into the schools, the healthcare system,” Greg Cox of Lancaster, Pensylvania told WNEP ABC 16. “If the budget is tight these days, why not make it legal to get the tax revenue?”

New Jersey’s Assembly and Senate committees voted in favor of companion bills that would legalize marijuana and provide for the expungement of prior cannabis convictions, Marijuana Moment reported.

The Assembly Appropriations Committee voted 6-1, with two abstentions, to advance the bill.

The Senate Judiciary Committee also approved its own version of the legalization legislation which resulted in a 6-4 vote, with one abstention.

Assembly and Senate committees also approved separate companion bills to amend requirements to qualify for medical cannabis in the state. Another piece of legislation was also passed by both committees that would change the procedure for expunging criminal records.

Now the bill goes off for one final vote on the NJ Senate floor where the full Senate and Assembly must approve the measure before NJ Gov. Phil Murphy (who is pro-legalization) can sign it, NJ.com reported.

“This legislation is critically important as we move toward legalization of adult-use cannabis in New Jersey,” Assembly member Jamel Holley (D), who sponsored the expungement bill, said in a press release. “Without this bill, many residents would continue to be affected by the criminalization of small amounts marijuana as a result of prior convictions long after the laws change.”

If passed, the law would allow adults 21 and older to possess, consume and purchase a certain amount of cannabis as restricted by the bill.

Going forward, a five-member commission would be formed and held responsible for studying the effects of legalization as well as assuring social equity in the marijuana industry. The regulatory commission would also be put in charge of approving licenses for the local cannabis industry including cultivators, processors, wholesalers and retailers.

Marijuana deliveries and social consumption sites would be approved; however, home cultivation would be prohibited if the law passes.

“Today’s votes are an important step toward legalizing adult-use marijuana in New Jersey. Although this bill is not perfect, we greatly appreciate the changes that the sponsors of the legislation have made based on the recommendations of advocates,” Roseanne Scotti, New Jersey state director for the Drug Policy Alliance, said in a press release. “While we are encouraged by the inclusion of provisions that our coalition has advocated for – such as expanded expungement – to better address fairness and equity, we are disappointed that there is no provision that allocates tax revenue generated by marijuana sales back to the communities most harmed by marijuana prohibition.”

Further, If the bill passes, it gives regulators about six months to set up the full rules and regulations on the industry. It then gives another six months for the commission to start allowing sales of marijuana throughout the state.

Lawmakers have also expressed there will be a $42 tax on each ounce of marijuana grown in the state. The tax would be imposed on the growers, not the buyers, but would be passed down to consumers in the form of how much each ounce would cost.

Municipalities would then be able to claim some of the revenue, according to the statement from lawmakers. Towns that have marijuana stores would be able to impose up to a 3 percent tax on all items sold, while towns that have growers could charge up to a 2 percent tax and towns with wholesalers could charge at least 1 percent of tax.

It’s worth noting that towns banning marijuana businesses would not get any tax revenue that is accumulated from the marijuana industry.

Meanwhile, in New Jersey’s neighboring state of Pennsylvania, lawmakers have proposed a marijuana recreational bill. Unlike NJ’s bill, it would allow people to grow up to six of their own plants, something that NJ opted to vote against.

However, similar New Jersey, it would also enable expunging or erasing marijuana-related convictions from citizens’ records.

Marijuana is now legal for medical purposes in 33 states and as a recreational drug in 10 out of the 50 states. Meanwhile, marijuana remains illegal federally; however, the 2018 Farm bill slightly legalized the other industry hemp when President Donald Trump signed what’s being deemed “the Farm Bill of 2018” into law right before Christmas of last year on December 20th, 2018.

The Farm Bill was introduced by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell who announced that he would propose the legislation alongside Senator Rand Paul to legalize hemp by removing it from the list of controlled substances, where cannabis sits alongside psilocybin mushrooms, MDMA, and heroin. The bill would also offer “full protection for individual farmers as well as the interstate commerce of U.S. grown and manufactured hemp products; normalize finance, banking, insurance, and other business proceedings for the hemp industry; advance research opportunities; ensure access to public water rights for hemp farmers; and protect the increasing and perhaps unlimited variety of hemp-derived products by promulgating a ‘whole plant’ definition of Hemp.”

It’s “an $867 billion, five-year spending bill that funds agricultural, nutrition and other federal programs — also loosened some federal restrictions on cannabis. It legalized hemp by removing it from the Controlled Substances Act while preserving the FDA’s authority to regulate the products,” CNBC reported.

The FDA currently prohibits companies from adding CBD and THC to food, drinks, and supplements. The agency also forbids manufacturers and retailers from making any therapeutic claims about their products. It also restrains the sale of food, supplements and other products containing CBD across state lines at its current state of laws.

However, recently resigned FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb even stated that the agency is looking for “pathways” to legalize the sale of CBD oil and other cannabis-derived compounds in food, beverages, and supplements.

Gottlieb also said that the FDA plans to maintain a website specifically dedicated to cannabis and CBD called “FDA and Marijuana: Questions and Answers.”

“We recognize the potential opportunities that cannabis or cannabis-derived compounds could offer and acknowledge the significant interest in these possibilities,” Gottlieb said in a statement. “We’re committed to pursuing an efficient regulatory framework for allowing product developers that meet the requirements under our authorities to lawfully market these types of products.”

Activist Post previously wrote that several restaurants are suddenly offering cannabidiol (CBD) infused snacks and drinks; however, according to several state regulators, selling them is illegal.

CBD oil is derived as a powerful ingredient reaped from the hemp plant. Many may find it shocking to learn that CBD is similar to a compound that our bodies produce naturally, and from birth, called endocannabinoids. Cannabinoids aren’t just found in the cannabis plant, they’re also naturally occurring in other plants in nature, they are just found at a higher potency in cannabis.

CBD and marijuana has shown promise as a treatment for conditions like epilepsy and anxiety in early research. Although more research is needed into CBD oil and marijuana and its effects, much of the studies have been positive. So much so that there are now colleges adding cannabis to their curriculum, teaching on both the hemp and cannabis industries as Activist Post reported last week.

Aaron Kesel writes for Activist Post. Support us at Patreon. Follow us on Minds, Steemit, SoMee, BitChute, Facebook and Twitter. Ready for solutions? Subscribe to our premium newsletter Counter Markets.

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Universities Across The U.S. Are Adding Cannabis To Their Curriculum

By Aaron Kesel

All across the U.S. colleges are now adding cannabis (both hemp and marijuana) programs to their curriculum, including schools in states where recreational marijuana remains illegal, for students to major in the cannabis industry, according to a new report by CBS 3.

“More jobs are being created in this space than in any other space in North America, with salaries sometimes more competitive than other industries,” Karson Humiston, founder of Vangst, an employment agency focused on cannabis jobs, recently told the Associated Press. “With every new state that legalizes, tons of jobs are opening up.”

Research shows there several career openings in the cannabis industry, varying from greenhouse and dispensary operators to edible product developers, marketing specialists, quality assurance lab directors, and even pharmaceutical researchers. Activist Post previously reported that a study found, “More Than Half Quit Using Prescription Drugs After Using Cannabis and CBD Products.”

There are an exceeding number of at least 850 brands of marijuana-derived CBD products on the market and 150 hemp-derived solutions according to the study. It’s worth noting for the reader that marijuana and hemp are the two variations of the cannabis plant.

Arcview Market Research, a firm that focuses on cannabis business, estimates the industry will be responsible for 467,000 jobs by 2022.

Colleges all over the U.S. are now offering a cannabis curriculum to students even in states where recreational marijuana remains illegal or pending legislation like New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut.

Other states offering degrees in the cannabis industry at numerous universities to students include North Dakota, Michigan, Colorado, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and California, to name a few.

Specifically, the universities that are following suit, according to the report:

  • Colorado State University offers a cannabis studies minor focusing on social, legal, political and health impacts.
  • Minot State University in North Dakota, offers students the ability to learn lab skills applicable to medical marijuana, botanical supplements and food science industries.
  • Ohio State University, Harvard, the University of Denver and Vanderbilt offer classes on marijuana policy and law.
  • The University of Connecticut is launching a cannabis horticulture program this spring.
  • Stockton University started an interdisciplinary cannabis minor last fall and recently forged an academic partnership with Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia that gives students the opportunity for internships and research work in medical marijuana and hemp.
  • UCLA’s Cannabis Research Initiative, which bills itself as one of the first academic programs in the world dedicated to the study of cannabis, has studies underway ranging from medical treatments to economic impacts.

In 2017, the University of Northern Michigan was the first college to offer a four-year undergraduate major degree in Medicinal Plant Chemistry program. One of its professors told CNBC how much money students could make out of school:

“All of our graduates are going to be qualified to be analysts in a lab setting,” Brandon Canfield, the associate professor of analytical chemistry who started the program, tells CNBC Make It. That could lead to a position that pays $70,000 right out of school, he added.

Cannabis businesses differ from medical and recreational marijuana to foods, fabrics and a myriad of other products derived from industrial hemp.

Hemp has only a trace of THC, but produces cannabidiol, or CBD, used in nutritional and therapeutic products as well as beverages and snacks that are increasingly being banned as Activist Post previously reported.

CBD oil is derived as a powerful ingredient reaped from the hemp plant. Many may find it shocking to learn that CBD is similar to a compound that our bodies produce naturally, and from birth, called endocannabinoids. Cannabinoids aren’t just found in the cannabis plant, they’re also naturally occurring in other plants in nature, they are just found at a higher potency in cannabis.

CBD has shown promise as a treatment for conditions like epilepsy and anxiety in early research. Although more research is needed into CBD oil and its effects, much of the studies have been positive.

Marijuana is now legal for medical purposes in 33 states and as a recreational drug in 10 out of the 50 states. Meanwhile, marijuana remains illegal federally; however, the 2018 Farm bill slightly legalized hemp when President Donald Trump signed what’s being deemed “the Farm Bill of 2018” into law right before Christmas of last year on December 20th, 2018.

The Farm Bill was introduced by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell who announced that he would propose the legislation alongside Senator Rand Paul to legalize hemp by removing it from the list of controlled substances, where cannabis sits alongside psilocybin mushrooms, MDMA, and heroin. The bill would also offer “full protection for individual farmers as well as the interstate commerce of U.S. grown and manufactured hemp products; normalize finance, banking, insurance, and other business proceedings for the hemp industry; advance research opportunities; ensure access to public water rights for hemp farmers; and protect the increasing and perhaps unlimited variety of hemp-derived products by promulgating a ‘whole plant’ definition of Hemp.”

It’s “an $867 billion, five-year spending bill that funds agricultural, nutrition and other federal programs — also loosened some federal restrictions on cannabis. It legalized hemp by removing it from the Controlled Substances Act while preserving the FDA’s authority to regulate the products,” CNBC reported.

The FDA currently prohibits companies from adding CBD and THC to food, drinks, and supplements. The agency also forbids manufacturers and retailers from making any therapeutic claims about their products. It also restrains the sale of food, supplements and other products containing CBD across state lines at its current state of laws.

However, recently resigned FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb even stated that the agency is looking for “pathways” to legalize the sale of CBD oil and other cannabis-derived compounds in food, beverages, and supplements.

Gottlieb also said that the FDA plans to maintain a website specifically dedicated to cannabis and CBD called “FDA and Marijuana: Questions and Answers.”

“We recognize the potential opportunities that cannabis or cannabis-derived compounds could offer and acknowledge the significant interest in these possibilities,” Gottlieb said in a statement. “We’re committed to pursuing an efficient regulatory framework for allowing product developers that meet the requirements under our authorities to lawfully market these types of products.”

Meanwhile, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) stressed that CBD is still illegal. Last year, a spokesperson for the agency explained to Indiana news WTHR that those who violate federal drug laws still run the “risk of arrest and prosecution.” Although, he reassured that the DEA is not going after individuals who have benefited from CBD oil.

“It would not be an appropriate use of federal resources to go after a mother because her child has epileptic seizures and has found something that can help and has helped. Are they breaking the law? Yes, they are. Are we going to break her door down? Absolutely not. And I don’t think she’ll be charged by any U.S. Attorney,” DEA spokesperson Rusty Payne told the Indiana news station.

With the Farm Bill of 2018 passed and signed by U.S. President Trump, the legislation effectively removes industrial hemp from Schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act. While it federally legalizes the commercial cultivation of the crop, what wasn’t touched was CBD oil-based products.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved its very first cannabis-derived drug in June of last year, Epidiolex a (cannabidiol) [CBD] oral solution for the treatment of seizures associated with two rare and severe forms of epilepsy, according to the regulator’s website.

So now a new extension of the drug war seems to be brewing against products with CBD oil in them as an adjuvant, with the states fighting back against the FDA’s own opinion on CBD oil.

As the marijuana industry grows high time alongside the hemp and CBD industries, these colleges are preparing graduates for careers in cultivating, researching and analyzing both hemp and marijuana herbs. A report from New Frontier Data predicts that by 2020 the legal cannabis market will create more than a quarter of a million jobs and people will need to be trained for those businesses. This is a step in the right direction to enable future generations a career in medical marijuana, hemp or any of the other cannabis industries.

Aaron Kesel writes for Activist Post. Support us at Patreon. Follow us on Minds, Steemit, SoMee, BitChute, Facebook and Twitter. Ready for solutions? Subscribe to our premium newsletter Counter Markets.

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